My most challenging landscape painting yet!

I am so proud to now finally reveal to you the finished Naseby painting. This painting has been a long time in the making, but as we all know good things take time. It is a commission for the best clients an artist could hope for.

But first, the story behind the painting.

Like every good project, it started with a conversation. I asked “When is your favourite time of year to visit this spot?” The answer was autumn, when the leaves had turned into dreamy, warm tones. So we waited a few months, and in May of 2018 Mark and I drove to Naseby - a little over 5 hours from Christchurch.

Up at sunrise the next morning I remember the crisp autumn air, the stillness of the water, the dew on the grass, and the stunning golden morning light on the trees. We wandered around some of the clients’ favourite spots in Naseby and I could quickly see why this was their favourite time of year. Naseby was popping with yellows and oranges, and I was so incredibly inspired!

It was apparently a difficult choice to make as the colours gave such a wide array of amazing shots. However, their favourite fishing spot, Coalpit Dam, was chosen from the several hundred photos I had taken that morning.

It wasn’t until August when the easel became free for the Naseby project after finishing a portrait commission. Or should I say easels; the canvas is so large I had to buy a second easel to hold it up. This was the largest canvas I have tackled to date.

The scale of the canvas took some time to get use to. At 1620mm wide by 760mm high, it was a lot larger than my usual landscapes. My inner critic was rather tough on me, and I questioned myself consistently. I was really surprised at how mentally challenging this project was, and it wasn’t until the final stages that I had convinced my brain that it was all going to work out just how I planned. I’m thrilled with the final result, and the challenge of getting through the self-critique has made it all the more rewarding.

I love that my clients challenge me, and this project has been one of the most challenging landscapes I have ever worked on. I have learnt so much and feel so proud that this is now complete. I also have the bonus of enjoying it while it dries before the trip south to deliver it to its lucky new owners..

In time I will release a ‘behind the scenes’ video. For now, check out the photos below.

Thanks for joining me.

Looking proud next to the final painting.

Looking proud next to the final painting.

‘Morning Light on Coalpit Dam’ 1620x760mm, Oil on canvas, 2019.

‘Morning Light on Coalpit Dam’ 1620x760mm, Oil on canvas, 2019.

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Behind the scenes progress photos:


Where in the world is Georgette?

…She’s back in New Zealand.

My apologies for the radio silence from me all year. 2019 has started off with a bang!

It started with our engagement at the end of last year. Mark proposed at our favourite sailing spot - Charteris Bay in Lyttelton Harbour. Down by the waters edge at the boat ramp, the love of my life asked me to marry him, and of course I said YES! This made for an extra happy New Years Eve!

We wanted to celebrate our engagement with family and friends at our home, but needed to do alterations to our deck first. There’s nothing like a deadline to get things done! So all of January saw us demolishing and completely re-building half of the deck! The party was on a perfect Summer’s day so everyone got to enjoy our handiwork.

Mark and I building the deck.

Mark and I building the deck.

Mark and I at our engagement party standing on the deck.

Mark and I at our engagement party standing on the deck.

Japan adventures

In March we flew to Japan for 2 1/2 weeks of adventure, culture, history and craziness. Highlights included: tree skiing at Kiroro ( in Hokkaido), a cooking lesson in Osaka, singing Karaoke with the locals till 3am, dressing up in a kimono in Kyoto, and the madness of the robot restaurant in Tokyo.

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If you are visiting Japan I highly recommend the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum and teamLab Borderless Tokyo (Digital Art Museum) - this exhibition was full of colourful interactive projections, lights, lanterns and fun. An exhibition you can easily get lost in!

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While in Japan I decided to treat myself with a visit to Pigment - the most stunning, well designed art store I have ever seen. The Japanese have an effortlessly elegant approach of presentation, and Pigment was no exception. I treated myself to some beautiful traditional sumi brushes, bamboo paper and a gold leaf kit. I am looking forward to trying these out!

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What’s on the easel?

I have been busy working on the Nasbey landscape oil painting. I am now in the final stages. My list of things left to do is getting smaller and smaller which makes it very exciting. These final details are sometimes subtle and the colour is critical to get right. Therefore I can no longer paint at night as the fake light plays with the colours. So I have a policy to only paint during daylight hours, which means I have to wait to the weekends. I am looking forward to the Easter break to get some day light hours on the piece. Here is it now on the easel. Not far to go! Stay tuned. Thanks for stopping by.

Working in progress, Naseby oil painting, 1620x760mm.

Working in progress, Naseby oil painting, 1620x760mm.


2018 - What a year!

2018 - gosh it’s been one heck of a year! Looking back on the year I am amazed at what I achieved. Some of the highlights include:

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I came into the year thinking “Hey stop being so shy - get out there and exhibit your work. Let’s see how it goes.” I had no idea what a ride of a year it would be!

Getting out there

I hit the ground running with a solo exhibition in January. I hadn’t intended to start this way, but fate had it’s own say. After catching up with a gallery contact I learned of a chance opportunity for a space in the Arts Centre. I had one week to prepare - eek! It was madness and such a buzz. Best of all I learned so much. I hadn’t expected to throw myself into a solo first up. But the opportunity was there and I couldn’t pass it by.

Solo exhibition

The lady that made it all possible. Lorraine Quinn helped man the exhibition while I was at work during the working week. Thank you Lorraine.

With a bit more confidence behind me I plucked up the courage to enter 11 group exhibitions throughout the year. Some were for charity fundraisers, one was an international painting swap but most of them were local shows with fellow Canterbury artists.

New Art Friends

At the start of the year I joined the Arts Canterbury, a group of local artists. This opened so many doors for me this year. I was invited to many group shows and got to see behind the scenes of the biggest Christchurch show, the Christchurch Art Show. What I loved the most was meeting other artists and sharing our stories together. Previously I had been so shy at these art events. I wasn’t a natural at networking. The fellow artists in Arts Canterbury were so friendly and I loved chatting away to these new friends at each event throughout the year.

Cover Girl

Ok so no, I wasn’t on the cover of a magazine but my artwork was. This came as quite a shock. After submitting my images and words for an article in the New Zealand artist magazine I was shocked when they informed me my artwork was chosen for the cover! I still get a kick out of seeing the cover on our coffee table. The photo below was also my most liked photo on instagram for 2018!

On the cover

Myself holding my cover of the New Zealand Artist Magazine. Read more here.

The Art

This year I have many amazing projects with my clients, including beautiful landscapes and portraits of passed loved ones and dogs. I am truly grateful to all my clients for the opportunity to create some magic for them. I love that I am constantly challenged by my clients. Every artist wants to continue to grow and I love that each project demands me to step out of my comfort zone and push me further, even if it scares me at times! This includes starting my largest project to date!

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Going BIG!

Standing next to the canvas it is wide as I am tall! Phew!

Artist retreat

Another thing I was grateful for this year was the experience of my artist retreat to Hinewai Reverse. Not only did I have a fantastic escape from the city to wind down and create some art. I also made a great friend. You can read more about my adventure here.

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Outside the hut at Hinewai at the end of my artist retreat weekend. Such a highlight.

I couldn’t have achieved any of this year without the love and support of this man! My Mark. I’m so grateful for his continued support for my artistic endeavours. Here’s a little sketch I created for his birthday :)

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My Mark

I couldn’t have achieved what I did without his support.

I wrote most of this blog before December 30th. Something big happened that day so I have had to update this blog before posting! Mark proposed at our favourite sailing spot in Charteris Bay in Lyttelton Harbour. We are absolutely delighted! It was such an exciting way to end the year and see in the New Year!

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Our engagement

Smiling the day after our engagement with the view of Charteris Bay behind us.

What will 2019 bring?

I have great plans to experiment with new techniques and materials. I want to get outside in these warmer months and try my new plein air equipment! I like the idea of being out in nature and creating art - two of my favourite things. And now we have wedding to plan for too :)

To wrap things up I created a quick snapshot of 2018 in the video below. Enjoy.

And for those of you that followed my journey this year, thank you so much for your support.


How Many Faces Can You See? - Major Menagerie's Travelling Circus

I just recently got this artwork back after a few months hanging in the St George’s Cancer ward. I hope that this piece brightened folk’s days as they passed in the hallway.

I created “Major Menagerie’s Travelling Circus” last year for a small exhibition where each artist was presented with a piece of A3 watercolour paper to fill how we liked.

I used my ‘Wash & Ink’ method. I splashed about some watercolour paint and then inked in what I saw within the random watercolour shapes. I first drew the pants. I expected that a character would then flow to fill said pants. However it took a different turn, face after face appeared and I drew them all in. It certainly made an unexpected and fun piece.

Watch the video to see how many faces you can count.

‘Major Menagerie’s Travelling Circus’ 2017, Wash & Ink on paper, 297mm x 420mm (11.6 in x 16.5 in)

‘Major Menagerie’s Travelling Circus’ 2017, Wash & Ink on paper, 297mm x 420mm (11.6 in x 16.5 in)

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Oil Painting Portrait - Two attempts 13 years apart

Last year I finally plucked up the courage to paint my Grandfather. It had been 13 years since my first attempt. After my first attempt I hoped one day I could paint him more realistically and vowed not to paint him again until I could do him justice.

I never got to meet my Grandad Jack, but grew up hearing stories about him. The photograph I painted from was in pride of place in my Nana’s flat, usually somewhere prominent like on top of the tv (back in the days when tvs were boxes). I knew this was a special photo of him.

I painted this portrait as a gift for my Aunty, but I had a feeling that it would be special to the whole family. I hope that I have done him justice. I am proud of my attempt and I hope he is proud of me.

During the early stages of the portrait I mapped out his face with monochromatic washes (shown directly below), focusing on form and light. These washes ran like tears around his eyes. This was an emotional moment for me, as I sensed we were connected in our mutual loss of never having met. Through the process of building the layers I felt I learnt more about the man I had heard so much about.

Value study. Close-up on the right.

Value study. Close-up on the right.

Jack Dobson Oil on canvas 350x450mm

Jack Dobson Oil on canvas 350x450mm

Below you can see a comparison between my two attempts. As you can see, I’m pretty chuffed with the final result of the painting. Below this is a video showing the painting form - I took a photo at the end of each work session and compiled these into a video. I hope you enjoy it as much as enjoyed the painting process!

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Painting Experiment - Left vs Right Hand

I was curious to compare my left and right hands painting the same scene. I expected the results to be wildly different with wild wiggly lines coming from my life hand. I decided to paint the same scene, a still life of pumpkins, first with my left hand. By going first with my left, then I would prevent "cheating" by passing on any learnings of my right hand of the scene to the left hand.

To my surprise my left hand actually achieved realism. Perhaps I had built but pathways in my left hand many years ago when I broken the pinky on my right hand. I had to write using my left hand for several weeks!

I was able to use my same painting process, building up the layers the same way as I usually do and it came together. I was certainly slower and more frustrated using my left but it worked. I was amazed at how tiring it was using my left hand!

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Bentley is very proud of his work!

Bentley is very proud of his work!


Artist Retreat in Hinewai Reserve

I recently went on my first artist retreat. I have come back completely recharged and inspired - I hope this feeling lasts!

This will be a memory I will treasure - full of adventure, relaxation, education, and inspiration!

I drove to Hinewai Reserve in the South Eastern corner of Banks Peninsula on the Friday night. The weather had packed it in that day but I was hopeful it would clear. Tricia welcomed me with a hug - we had been communicating for a few months and had the chance to meet in person a couple of weekends earlier at the Pegasus Art Show. Tricia, Paul and I sat at their kitchen table and ate feta (made by Paul) and crackers. We got on so well, it felt like I had known them both for years.

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The following morning I drove to the top of the hill at sunrise to take a photo of the view for a friend. Hoping for clearer weather, I was met by a dusting of snow - not quite what I was anticipating but made for nice scenery!

Sunrise the first morning.

Sunrise the first morning.

As part of the Artist Retreat, the artist helps in the garden in the morning in exchange for staying at the reserve. As it was still raining Tricia found an inside task for us to do by the fire. What a great idea! While we cleaned the leaves and ink off plant tags, the sun came out and revealed the beauty of Hinewai.

After we finished cleaning the tags, I headed out for a walk in the reserve. The trees were calming and I soaked in the fresh air from the ferns. It felt like it washed away the stress from the working week. When I returned to my cabin I realised I had dropped a glove in the forest - it was as though the forest didn’t want me to leave yet! Luckily I didn’t have to search too far.

(Tap to see more pics above).

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Before our art session I wandered around to find inspiration. I wanted the artwork to be a direct inspiration from the area.

(Tap to see more pics above).

My inspiration for my first sketch. Paul & Tricia’s Kakariki birds which I photographed moments before our art session.

My inspiration for my first sketch. Paul & Tricia’s Kakariki birds which I photographed moments before our art session.

Inside the house again, Tricia and I started ‘Arting’ as Tricia puts it :) I started an ink and wash drawing of the Kakariki birds that Paul and Tricia breed. Such gorgeous green and red feathers - how could I not. Tricia worked on some garden inspired artworks for a garden themed exhibition she is hosting at the house.

Start of the Kakariki sketch.

Start of the Kakariki sketch.

Tricia’s artist friend Tori Batt arrived with artworks for the upcoming exhibition. It was wonderful to meet her and the three of us chatted about art related things by the fire, drinking tea and eating freshly baked lemon cupcakes. It felt like we could talk all night if we let ourselves. So lovely to have like minded artists all in one room. Tori give me an artist proof of her first zine she had just finished which I will treasure. Thank you Tori - you can find her work here.

Paul invited me to join him to feed the Kakariki some broom flowers. WOW! I took the camera into the aviary and snapped away happily. What gorgeous birds! And the best inspiration to finish off my drawing.

(Tap to see more pics above).

Further progress on the Kakariki sketch.

Further progress on the Kakariki sketch.

The next morning I was up the hill again and sadly it was worse weather for a sunrise. Cloudy and sad looking - ah well it got me out of bed and awake!

Sunrise day two.

Sunrise day two.

By the time I finished breakfast the weather was good enough for Tricia and I to get stuck into the garden where I had a lesson on Hydrangea pruning. Thank you Tricia for holding off your pruning specially to teach me how a pro does it.

Then I was lucky enough to get the opportunity to go with Paul out to the headland. Paul needed to check the rain gauges as part of the data that is collected on the Hinewai Reserve. I helped by holding the wind meter - which was really fun! On the way back Paul gave me a botany lesson of some of the plants and trees in the area.

(Tap to see more pics above).

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Me at the mouth of Otanerito Bay. Wind gusts of up to 78.5 kph!

Me at the mouth of Otanerito Bay. Wind gusts of up to 78.5 kph!

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After a spot of lunch Tricia and I were ‘Arting’ again by the fire. I got a sneak peak at some new work that Tricia is developing - some absolutely stunning pencil drawings of animals and insects.

While we were working away Paul came inside and said to me “I think this is the type of pet you’d like” and placed a weta down onto my hand. I freaked for a second as I imagined the little feet were going to tickle my hand. Tricia captured hilarious photos of my reaction on camera. Here is one of the better ones once I had composed myself!

How lucky am I to hold this rare and special weta. This is an Akaroa Tree Weta, which resides only in the South Eastern corner of Banks peninsula. It is considered New Zealand’s rarest weta so I feel very privileged indeed to get to see one up close - let alone hold one.

After the excitement of the weta we placed her back out side and I finished off my drawing of the artist retreat cabin. I later gifted this artwork to Tricia to hang in the cabin.

My time at Hinewai was so special. Full of great yarns, creating art, exploring and tapping into the calming effect of nature and the beauty of being out of cellphone reception - away from my normal routines and distractions from technology. I have felt much calmer this week and when I do feel myself getting stressed I say to myself “Hinewai, Hinewai”, exhaling slowly.

I would thoroughly recommend the Hinewai Artist Retreat to artists wanting to escape, recharge and gain inspiration. Tricia and Paul are the most welcoming hosts. If you want to get in touch with Tricia you can email her on otanerito@gmail.com or reach out on her Facebook page ‘Tricia Hewlett Artist’

My finished drawing of the Artist Retreat Cabin.

My finished drawing of the Artist Retreat Cabin.

I had to show the Kakariki the finished bird sketch.

I had to show the Kakariki the finished bird sketch.

The finished Karariki sketch.

The finished Karariki sketch.


Tractor Heaven Oil Painting - Time Lapse

A time lapse of a painting I created in 2017. Watch 'Tractor Heaven' come to live throughout the layers.

This is a view of Paton's Rock beach in the Golden Bay area of New Zealand's South Island. I was holidaying here one summer and was very curious as to why the tractor would sit out there for hours.

If you watch closely you can see when I changed the size of the tractor dramatically. 

‘Tractor Heaven’ 2017, Oil on panel, 200 x 200mm , (7.8 inx 7.8 in)

‘Tractor Heaven’ 2017, Oil on panel, 200 x 200mm , (7.8 inx 7.8 in)

Finished and sitting on the easel.

Finished and sitting on the easel.


I'm addicted to creating

I've been thinking that there are some parallels between my need to paint and descriptions of addiction. But addicted in good way.

Looking back there were signs even at a young age. My Aunty Mary took me away for a beach holiday to one of our favourite beaches when I was five or six. It was a wonderful time but we hadn't packed any drawing paper. As soon she returned me home I dove into the hot water cupboard where the scrap paper was stored and then furiously started drawing out ideas on the floor. My Aunty commented that obviously I had been missing drawing equipment!

During primary school images were much easier for me to relate to than words. And word soon got out that I could draw. Kids would pass their books down the table for me to draw up a fancy title page for the latest topic.

Once when I was collected from school I announced I had had the best day ever at school.  "We did art all day. We drew pictures and made sculptures. If only school was like that every day!" I still agree with that statement, if only everyday was filled with art.

Returning from a fun weekend staying with a friend I was in a really bad mood. After some questioning from my mother I said, "Yes I had fun but I didn't get any of my project work done and I have so many ideas."

Later on in my high school years I would be up late on a painting roll. Mum would put her head around the corner and say “Come on, time to go to bed.” In those days I painted in acrylics so I had a handy excuse up my sleeve “Oh but I've just mixed up some colours Mum. I can't stop now or they'll dry” so she would leave me for another hour, for which I would have conveniently just mixed another batch by the time she came back hehe! At which point she said “You would paint all night if I let you!” And of course I replied “Then why don't you!?”

Nowadays I think about painting all the time. It's like I'm itching to get my next fix. Planning the next strokes on a painting. Seeing a sunrise and analysing how I would mix the colours. Looking at photos and breaking down the shapes in my mind. Looking at a landscape and planning the order of the layers. When there are days when I don't paint I'm anxious to when I can next get on the brushes. And when there are multiple days not painting I'm almost tapping and the table wanting to get back to it.

Am I obsessed? I hope I don’t come across that way. I think it is healthy to have a passion and a drive. Everyone needs one. I feel lucky that I have found mine and I discovered it so early on in life. It is comforting that it is something that has always been with me and always will be. It’s like a loyal friend.

A young Georgette aged 4 years. Much later in life I painted this as gift for my sister.

A young Georgette aged 4 years. Much later in life I painted this as gift for my sister.

Picking up on harmonise colours from a young age. Pig, aged 5 1/2 years.

Picking up on harmonise colours from a young age. Pig, aged 5 1/2 years.

A witch with many rings. Aged 8 years.

A witch with many rings. Aged 8 years.

Comic strip of characters I developed aged 10 years.

Comic strip of characters I developed aged 10 years.

Scotty dog, aged 11 years.

Scotty dog, aged 11 years.

Happy family. Vampire family drawing aged 11 years.

Happy family. Vampire family drawing aged 11 years.

Mural on Ashburton College 2017. Aged 17 years.

Mural on Ashburton College 2017. Aged 17 years.

'Young Georgette' Acrylic on board, 2007. Aged 17 years.

'Young Georgette' Acrylic on board, 2007. Aged 17 years.


The Canvas Project - A Visual Encylopedia

I think it's important to find ways to renew inspiration in our creative endeavours. Inspiration from external or unexpected places can result in you exploring a direction you may not have otherwise thought of. So I decided to join The Canvas Project by The Brooklyn Art Library. The project is best described by The Brooklyn Art Library

...a visual encyclopedia compiled by creative people from around the world, completed on mini canvases. As a kickoff to this challenge, our artist community contributed words that are meant to inspire and energize their fellow artists. We have exactly 2,000 prompted words that will make up the entirety of The Canvas Project.
— Brooklyn Art Library

Put simply each artist receives a tiny canvas and a word to express in their own way. The artist returns that canvas and then receives another artist's from somewhere in the world. All the canvases will be scanned to then compile in a visual encyclopedia book. How fun!

The word I received was "Mallam". Which I have to admit I had to look up the meaning. "Mallam is an honorific title given to Islamic scholars." I searched around for a figure that advocated for good and came across, Makarem Shirazi an Iranian religious leader. In reference to underage marriage Makarem stated that "although such marriages were permitted in the past, in modern times it has been demonstrated that they are not in the best interest of the parties involved and should be considered invalid".

The final painting

The final painting

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Watch the painting come to life in the time lapse below.


Front Cover - The New Zealand Artist Magazine

Even as I write this one week on from the magazine's release, I still don't quite believe it. My painting chosen for the cover of the New Zealand Artist! Crazy.

I feel very honoured to be have been chosen and it has been quite the buzz this past week. It certainly was the most surreal feeling to walk into the bookstore and see my work staring back at me from the shelves.

A very excited Georgette holding her cover of the New Zealand Artist magazine at the local bookstore.

A very excited Georgette holding her cover of the New Zealand Artist magazine at the local bookstore.

Close up of the cover.

Close up of the cover.

Oh fancy that! Look what found its way onto the coffee table.

Oh fancy that! Look what found its way onto the coffee table.

The article, page 14.

The article, page 14.

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Journey to Sunlight - Oil Painting

It's not often that the client is living in the same house. My good friend and flatmate Matt commissioned me to paint a scene that he had photographed from Mt Hutt looking down on the Rakaia Gorge. With the patchwork nature of the Canterbury Plains I knew it was going to be a challenge! And one I couldn't hide from the client :)

During the painting process there are times when it looks nothing like the final outcome. But the painter has the proceeding layers mapped out in their head. Thankfully Matt enjoyed watching the painting throughout each of the stages.

Below you can see some of the steps throughout the project. I have also created a time lapse of the painting coming together.

Early stages.

Early stages.

Detail of brushwork.

Detail of brushwork.

Working at night requires extra lighting.

Working at night requires extra lighting.

Colour matching is so much easier outside.

Colour matching is so much easier outside.

Journey to Sunlight, 2018, Oil on canvas, 900 x 450mm (35.4 in x 17.7 in)

Journey to Sunlight, 2018, Oil on canvas, 900 x 450mm (35.4 in x 17.7 in)


HWK Fundraiser Painting - 'Under the Blue'

When approached to help with a charity art auction to help raise funds for The Kings and Queen's Kapa Haka group I jumped at the chance to be involved.

Each artist was sent out a 'patu' shaped board to paint. Patu is a term used for a broad-blade club used by Māori warriors for close-quarter fighting. When I received the board I ponded what to create. The shape reminded me of a whale with its wide body and narrow tail. Remembering that the patu is a weapon I thought it even more appropriate to paint an animal that needs us to fight for its protection more than ever.

It wasn't until writing this blog that I realised that patu were sometimes made from whale bone. I find that almost spokey.

Watch below as I build up the layers of 'Under the Blue'.

2018, Oil on Patu Panel, 420x145mm, (16.5 in x 5.7 in)

2018, Oil on Patu Panel, 420x145mm, (16.5 in x 5.7 in)

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Portrait Oil Painting - Alan Dobson

Quite often my portrait commissions are a surprise for someone. It makes it exciting waiting for the big 'reveal'. I finished this painting in December and can finally reveal it to you now. This is a painting of my Great Uncle Alan it was commissioned by his son Colin. Colin flew over from Melbourne to pick up the painting and surprised his mother with the painting. She was delighted. What a beautiful gesture from a son to his mother, just in time for Mother's Day.

I have made a behind the scenes video to show the process of the painting coming to life. Check it out below.

2017, Oil on canvas, 350 x 450mm , (13.7 in x 17.7 in)

2017, Oil on canvas, 350 x 450mm , (13.7 in x 17.7 in)


A drastic way to fix an Oil Painting - Time Lapse

I had this painting of a summer hat but unfortunately it was damaged, so rather than fixing it I decided to have a bit of abstract fun with it instead.

Abstracts aren't usually my thing, I'm not trained in creating these but I felt like a little relaxation 😊 It was a lot of fun and has given me some ideas for future projects I want to try out. Don't you just love the textures and colour combinations here!

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Landscape Oil Painting - Mt Aspiring

This painting was such a thrill to create. I worked from a photograph I took from a helicopter of Mt Aspiring, New Zealand. How lucky I felt to see this magnificent mountain up close! 

Watch this artwork come together from sketch through to the final result.

To read more about this painting see an earlier post here.

Mt Aspiring, 2017, Oil on canvas, 700 x 400mm , (27.5 in x 15.7 in)

Mt Aspiring, 2017, Oil on canvas, 700 x 400mm , (27.5 in x 15.7 in)


Yosemite Landscape Painting - Process Photos

It is hard to believe it has been 8 years since I started painting the Yosemite painting. It took me over a year to complete and it travelled from America to New Zealand with me.

Here are some photos of the process and a younger looking me!

The very begining. 

The very begining. 

I had to use two easels to hold up this rather large blank canvas. It was winter time in the States and the sun would go down about 5pm so I was often working under lights.

So intent on get the right view point I would kneel for hours.

So intent on get the right view point I would kneel for hours.

Early stages.

Early stages.

The last progress photo in the States before transporting the painting to New Zealand.

The last progress photo in the States before transporting the painting to New Zealand.

Progress in New Zealand.

Progress in New Zealand.

Now working in the New Zealand Winter under lights.

Now working in the New Zealand Winter under lights.

The final push to the end.

The final push to the end.

I remember small sections would take me hours.

I remember small sections would take me hours.

The final piece. Yosemite. 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 1016mm x 609mm (40 in x 24 in)

The final piece. Yosemite. 2011, Acrylic on canvas, 1016mm x 609mm (40 in x 24 in)

The artwork now resides back in the States in California. It took over 125 hours to paint and was one of my most ambitious pieces of that time. The detail of this landscape was a challenge I relished. See some of the detail up close in the photos below.

 

Pet Portrait Oil Painting - Rueben the Dog

I thoroughly enjoyed this commission last year. An oil painting of Rueben the Dog. I loved the challenge of creating enough mood that dog stood out from the tussocks. This dog had sadly past away so I wanted to bring life back to Rueben through this painting. The client was stoked when she saw it for the first time as a surprise gift.

Check out the video below which shows this painting evolve throughout the layers.

Reuben the Dog, 2017, Oil on canvas, 350 x 450mm , (13.7 in x 17.7 in)

Reuben the Dog, 2017, Oil on canvas, 350 x 450mm , (13.7 in x 17.7 in)


Ink & Wash Time Lapse - Happy Fox

Recently some dear friends of mine had a baby boy. I couldn't resist drawing a gift for the new bub to represent my excitement for the arrival of such a treasure!! Check out the video below showing the drawing come to life.

Finished sketch unframed.

Finished sketch unframed.

Finished sketch all framed.

Finished sketch all framed.


Old Blue Black Robin Sketch

I created this sketch of 'Old Blue' the black robin was a thank you gift for a writer. She wrote a story designed to help my Mother's students who have difficulties in reading. A wonderful story about the revival of the black robin population. I was so taken by this writers generosity in offering her story to those in need, so I wanted to help in the form of a sketch.

Old Blue Black Robin, 2018, Ink & Wash on paper, 148mm x 210mm (5.8 in x 8.3 in)

Old Blue Black Robin, 2018, Ink & Wash on paper, 148mm x 210mm (5.8 in x 8.3 in)

Watch 'Old Blue' the black robin come to life. Here I show the process of drawing in the black robin bird after I have first laid down some watercolour washes. I really enjoyed drawing this wee native bird and must do some more.