drawing

How Many Faces Can You See? - Major Menagerie's Travelling Circus

I created “Major Menagerie’s Travelling Circus” last year for a small exhibition where each artist was presented with a piece of A3 watercolour paper to fill how we liked.

I used my ‘Wash & Ink’ method. I splashed about some watercolour paint and then inked in what I saw within the random watercolour shapes. I first drew the pants. I expected that a character would then flow to fill said pants. However it took a different turn, face after face appeared and I drew them all in. It certainly made an unexpected and fun piece.

Watch the video to see how many faces you can count.

 ‘Major Menagerie’s Travelling Circus’ 2017, Wash & Ink on paper, 297mm x 420mm (11.6 in x 16.5 in)

‘Major Menagerie’s Travelling Circus’ 2017, Wash & Ink on paper, 297mm x 420mm (11.6 in x 16.5 in)

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Ink & Wash Time Lapse - Happy Fox

Recently some dear friends of mine had a baby boy. I couldn't resist drawing a gift for the new bub to represent my excitement for the arrival of such a treasure!! Check out the video below showing the drawing come to life.

 Finished sketch unframed.

Finished sketch unframed.

 Finished sketch all framed.

Finished sketch all framed.


Old Blue Black Robin Sketch

I created this sketch of 'Old Blue' the black robin was a thank you gift for a writer. She wrote a story designed to help my Mother's students who have difficulties in reading. A wonderful story about the revival of the black robin population. I was so taken by this writers generosity in offering her story to those in need, so I wanted to help in the form of a sketch.

 Old Blue Black Robin, 2018, Ink & Wash on paper, 148mm x 210mm (5.8 in x 8.3 in)

Old Blue Black Robin, 2018, Ink & Wash on paper, 148mm x 210mm (5.8 in x 8.3 in)

Watch 'Old Blue' the black robin come to life. Here I show the process of drawing in the black robin bird after I have first laid down some watercolour washes. I really enjoyed drawing this wee native bird and must do some more.


Raising funds for the Christchurch City Mission

Recently I saw a sad figure walking down a street in my home city, Christchurch. The person was pushing a shopping trolley filled with their possessions but what was most haunting was they had covered their face with a threadbare blanket. I found this so heartbreaking to see a person so ashamed of their predicament that they had covered their identity.

 Sketch of the haunting homeless figure I saw which prompted my response. 

Sketch of the haunting homeless figure I saw which prompted my response. 

I felt compelled to stop and help but the blanket made me unsure of how approachable this person would be. So I decided to create this give a little page to raise fundings for the Christchurch City Mission. The work the mission does for those in need is invaluable - providing ways to improve the quality of people’s lives and enable them to be more self sufficient.

As a local artist I would like to see my art helping others in a positive way. As part of this fundraising effort I am donating a limited edition giclee print of 'Everything is Temporary' a sketch of the Christchurch Cathedral depicted as a sand castle, as a gift to a randomly selected donor as a thank you from me. 

 Limited edition giclee print on 100% cotton rag paper. 330mm x 345mm.

Limited edition giclee print on 100% cotton rag paper. 330mm x 345mm.

Any amount you are willing to donate is greatly appreciated. Together we hope to help make a change to the lives of those in need. Visit the give a little page below to donate.

givealittle.co.nz/fundraiser/helping-the-homeless-raising-funds

 

I AM / WE ARE - Group Exhibition

Last night was the opening for the I AM / WE ARE exhibition held at the Welder Collective. This is the last group exhibition to be held at the Welder Collective on Welles St before the building is transformed into another venture. The exhibition runs till February 28th.

The theme of the exhibition was to reflect on our roots and how this has affected us along our artistic journey. Its hard to forget the CHCH quakes, it was an event that will stay with me forever. It was a time when we realised that as much as we would like to create structures that will last forever unfortunately mother nature is always stronger. Much like a sand castle 'Everything is Temporary' which is the title of this piece. Yet there is an element of hope to this piece, by taking an almost 'childlike' perspective like they do towards sand castles that nature will have its way but we must accept it.

 The finished sketch unframed.

The finished sketch unframed.

As part of the theme each artist was also to submit an influence piece. This could be something that was given to them by a loved one. I chose to submit a poem written for me by my mother, below is the text I included in the programme: 

A poem from one of her number one fans - Mum. Growing up, Georgette knew she always had the support of both parents on her artistic journey. Her mother once told her “Fools and children should never see things half done”. This quote has served her well as she has often reminded herself of this comment when reviewing her own work at various stages of completion.

 The framed work hung at the I AM / WE ARE exhibition at the Welder Collective.

The framed work hung at the I AM / WE ARE exhibition at the Welder Collective.

 Close up on the poem.

Close up on the poem.


My first solo exhibition

I had never dreamed at the start of this year that by the end of January I would be exhibiting my work in my own show. Yet indeed this is what happened. With the help of my friend Lorraine I stumbled upon an opportunity too good to miss. A gallery space in the Arts Centre had become available the week of the World Buskers Festival so there would be a greater amount of foot traffic. I had to dispense with the fear and just do it!

So with just one week before opening I managed to get together enough of my work to fill the four walls. As well as organising paintings to to be scanned and printed at the printers and getting them produced in time for opening. It was an intense week!

This exhibition could not have been possible without the help of many people. Lorraine, who has owned many galleries, manned the show for me throughout the week days. She taught me so much throughout the week about how exhibitions work. My father helped me set up the exhibition on the Monday. My mother and partner supported me during the weekend with manning the show. At times it got very busy so it was so great to have their help.

For me it was so lovely to see how the public reacted to my work by seeing what their favourite pieces were and explaining the stories behind those pieces.  I was overwhelmed (in the very best way) by the support of friends and family who came in to see the exhibition and feel so honoured to be surrounded by such love.

 Me looking chuffed at the exhibition. Sketches and prints behind me.

Me looking chuffed at the exhibition. Sketches and prints behind me.

Click to the right hand end of this picture above to view more photos.

 Lorraine and I colour matching with the paintings behind us.

Lorraine and I colour matching with the paintings behind us.

My plan was that I would use the walls of the gallery leaving the floor space available to promote the talented work of my father Chris Thompson of Thompson woodworking. He designs and crafts custom furniture, to view his work see his site thompsonwoodworking.nz

 The talented work of Chris Thompson.

The talented work of Chris Thompson.

Over the course of the weekend I set up a Go Pro to capture the coming and goings of people during the exhibition. This is just some of the weekend.


Same, same but different

If you saw these two artworks side by side in a gallery you would be forgiven to think that they were from different artists. I would think so too. A few years ago these two works did hang side by side in a gallery in Akaroa. I wonder if many people noticed they were from the same artist. Were they confused, surprised, intrigued I wonder.

Two completely different styles of mine. In my best attempt to explain, I believe these artworks come from different sides of my brain. One side the detail focused perfectionist, thriving on the challenge to convey realism and the ever challenging likeness of a familiar face.

The other side the relaxed make it up as I go along, spontaneous, subconscious, imaginative, make mistakes into positives side of my brain. So in other words it's bizarre and I have no real clue why but it is fun to work in completely different styles.

 Left 'Lost Youth' 2012, Ink on paper, 230mm x 330mm (9in x 12.9in). Right 'Father and Daughter' 2013, White and black charcoal on brown paper, 260mm x 400mm (10.2in x 15.7in).

Left 'Lost Youth' 2012, Ink on paper, 230mm x 330mm (9in x 12.9in). Right 'Father and Daughter' 2013, White and black charcoal on brown paper, 260mm x 400mm (10.2in x 15.7in).